The Fish
Elizabeth Bishop

Girl
Jamaica Kincaid

The Author of to her book && To my dear && Loving husband
Anne Bradstreet

On being brought from Africa to America
Phillis Wheatley

Metaphor
Comparison without like or as “A mighty fortress is our God.”

Assonance
in poetry, the repetition of the sound of a vowel or diphthong in nonrhyming stressed syllables near enough to each other for the echo to be discernible (e.g., penitence, reticence ).

Alliteration
the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.

Foot
Combination of stressed and unstressed syllables

Sonnet
a poem of fourteen lines using any of a number of formal rhyme schemes, in English typically having ten syllables per line.
a poem of fourteen lines using any of a number of formal rhyme schemes, in English typically having ten syllables per line.

Symbol
a thing that represents or stands for something else, especially a material object representing something abstract

Rhyme
Corresponding sound between words or ending of words

Meter

Metric foot or feet

Petrarchan Sonnet
14 lines in two parts octave and sestet

Shakespearen Sonnet
The sonnets are almost all constructed from three quatrains, which are four-line stanzas, and a final couplet composed in iambic pentameter.[19] This is also the meter used extensively in Shakespeare’s plays.

Narrative
Narrative poetry is a form of poetry that tells a story, often making use of the voices of a narrator and characters as well; the entire story is usually written in metred verse

Simile
a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing using LIKE & AS example: “as brave as a lion, crazy like a fox”

Carpe Diem
CARPE DIEM: Literally, the phrase is Latin for “seize the day,” from carpere (to pluck, harvest, or grab) and the accusative form of die (day). The term refers to a common moral or theme in classical literature that the reader should make the most out of life and should enjoy it before it ends

Lyric
a type of emotional songlike poetry, distinguished from dramatic and narrative poetry

Personification
the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something nonhuman, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form.

Hyperbole
Exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally

Imagery
visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in a literary work.

Alliteration
the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.

Limerick
a humorous, frequently bawdy, verse of three long and two short lines rhyming aabba, popularized by Edward Lear.

Form
Physical structure of the poem- length of the lines, their rhythms, their system of rhymes and repetition

Line
a unit of language into which a poem or play is divided, which operates on principles which are distinct from and not necessarily coincident with grammatical structure

Stanza
Most poems are divided into stanzas (groups of lines), which are traditionally defined by rhyme and meter. Five common stanzas are couplets (two lines), triplet (three lines), quatrains (four lines), sestets (six lines), and octaves (eight lines)

Iambic
a commonly used type of metrical line in traditional English poetry and verse drama. The term describes the rhythm that the words establish in that line, which is measured in small groups of syllables called “feet”.

Couplet
2

Triplet
3

Quatrain
4

Quintet
5

Sestet
6

Septet
7

Octave
8

Iambic
Unstressed, Stressed

Trochaic
Stressed, Stressed

Anapestic
Unstressed, Unstressed, Stressed

Dactylic
Stressed, Unstressed, Unstresssd

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“Poetry is the best words in the best order”

Edward Lear
Created the limerick

Elements Of Poetry
Elements that make up a poem

Distinction between Poetry & Prose
Prose is straightforward and poetry is not

Lota de Macedo Soares
Believed to have had a relationship with Elizabeth Bishop from 1951-1967

Free Verse
requires no meter, rhyme, or other traditional poetic techniques

Blank Verse
A blank verse is a poem with no rhyme but does have iambic pentameter. This means it consists of lines of five feet, each foot being iambic, meaning two syllables long, one stressed followed by an unstressed.

End Rhyme
is when the last syllables within a verse rhyme.

Onomatopoeia
the naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it (such as buzz or hiss). Onomatopoeia may also refer to the use of words whose sound suggests the sense

Refrain
A refrain is a repeated part of a poem, particularly when it comes either at the end of a stanza or between two stanzas.

Hyperbole
Exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken seriously

Symbolism
The use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities

Personification
the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something nonhuman, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form.

Allusion
an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference.

Imagery
Visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in literally work

“All the worlds a stage and we are merely players”
Metaphor