The Lamb, William Blake
“Softest clothing, woolly, bright”

The Tiger, William Blake
“What immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry”

The Tiger, William Blake
“In what furnace was thy brain”?`

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802, William Wordsworth
“This city now doth, like a garment, wear the beauty of the morning”

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802, William Wordsworth
“Dull would be the soul who could pass by”

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802, William Wordsworth
“The river glideth at his own sweet will”

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802, William Wordsworth
“Never did the sun more beautifully steep in his first splendor”

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802, William Wordsworth
“the very houses seem asleep; and all that mighty heart is lying still”!

It Is a Beauteous Evening, William Wordsworth
“The holy time is quiet as a Nun breathless with adoration”

It Is a Beauteous Evening, William Wordsworth
“the mighty being is awake, and doth with his eternal motion make”

It Is a Beauteous Evening, William Wordsworth
“if thou appear untouched by solemn thought”

It Is a Beauteous Evening, William Wordsworth
“God being with thee when we know it not”

It Is a Beauteous Evening, William Wordsworth
“Thy nature is not therefore less divine”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“Or of some Hermit’s cave, where by his fire the Hermit sits alone”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“The day is come when i again repose here, under this dark sycamore”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“But oft, in lonely rooms, and ‘mid the din of towns and cities, i have owed to them in hours of weariness, sensations sweet”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“Almost suspended, we are laid asleep in body, and become a living soul: . . . we see into the life of things”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“and so i dare to hope, though changed, no doubt, from what i was when first i came among these hills”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“that time is past, and all its aching joys are now no more, and all its dizzy raptures.”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“the anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse, the guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul of all my moral being”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“therefore let the moon shine on thee in thy solitary walk”

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, William Wordsworth
“nor will thou then forget, that after many wanderings, many years of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs”

The World is Too Much With Us, William Wordsworth
“getting and spending, we lay waste our powers”

The World is Too Much With Us, William Wordsworth
the sea that bears her bosom to the moon; the winds that will be howling at all hours, and are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers”

The World is Too Much With Us, William Wordsworth
“we are out of tune, It moves us not”

The World is Too Much With Us, William Wordsworth
“so might I, standing on this pleasant lea, have glimpses that would make me less forlorn”

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“wander in gladness, and wind down, perchance, to that still roaring dell”

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“for thou hast pined and hunger’d after Nature, many a year”

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“Struck with deep joy may stand, as I have stood”

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“when the last rook beat its straight path across the dusky air”

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
“no sound is dissonant which tells of life”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“so calm, that it disturbs and vexes meditation with its strange and extreme stillness”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“only that film, which flutters on the grate, still flutters there”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“its motion in this hush of nature gives it dim sympathies with me who live, making it a companionable form”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
the idling Spirit by its won moods interprets, every where echo or mirror seeking itself, and makes a toy of Thought”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“lulled me to sleep, and sleep prolonged my dreams!”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“shalt wander like a breeze by lakes and sandy shores”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee”

Frost At Midnight, Coleridge
“Shall hang them up in silent icicles, quietly shining to the quiet moon”

Ozymandias, Shelley
“whose frown and wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command”

Ozymandias, Shelley
“which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, the hand that mocked them”

Ozymandias, Shelley
“round the decay of that colossal wreak, boundless and bare, the lone and level sands stretch far away”

Sonnet: England in 1819, Shelley
“An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king”

Sonnet: England in 1819, Shelley
“rulers who neither see, nor feel, nor know, but leech-like to their fainting country cling”

Sonnet: England in 1819, Shelley
“makes as a two-edged sword to all who wield, — Golden and sanguine”

Bright Star, John Keats
“would I were steadfast as thou art”

Bright Star, John Keats
“with eternal lids apart”

Bright Star, John Keats
“awake forever in sweet unrest, still, still to hear her tender-taken breath”

Bright Star, John Keats
“or else swoon to death”